Practicing Gratitude

Science shows us that grateful people are happy people.

This seems obvious, but let me reframe it. How often do we look inside of ourselves for happiness? How often to we believe that all we need for a happy life lies within us? If you are like me, your answers to these questions are probably “rarely” or “never”. We tend to put all the focus on our problems. Our problems consume our thoughts, our conversations, and alter our perspective on life. The “good” things- as big as a career you love and as small as a sunny afternoon- go unrecognized, undiscussed, and unappreciated.

Much of how we experience life is based on our perspective. Research estimates that our chosen perspective on life comprises 40% of our happiness. Perspective is a choice- something we have complete control over. If you can shift your perspective, you can control your experience. If you can control your experience, you can have happiness.

The best method I have found to remind myself to maintain a positive perspective and therefore cultivate happiness in my life is through a gratitude practice. A friend gifted me a gratitude journal several months ago. In the introduction, this journal gives a few valuable pieces of advice:

1) When things are at the very worst, it is the most critical time to cherish moments of joy. For example, if someone you love dies, there will be pain and grief. Allow yourself to feel it. But also allow yourself to feel and appreciate the glimmer of happiness that comes from telling stories about this person or a moment of unrelated laughter with a friend in the midst of your grieving period.

2) Always look for the “why” behind your gratitude. This will help identify and reinforce habits that cultivate happiness. For example, I am grateful for my yoga practice. Why? Because I am making time to care for myself and my wellbeing even on the craziest days. We relentlessly analyze the negative, so why not analyze the positive too?

We have started a habit in our house that we call “5 Things”. Each day JWD and I take turns listing 5 things we are grateful for. They can be anything from a delicious apple we ate at lunch to a meaningful moment with a friend. On some days 5 will feel hard- not because you lack 5 things to be grateful for, but because your perspective is blocking your view. Some days, 5 won’t seem like enough.

Today as we were walking in our neighborhood, JWD said “Ok babe, 5 things. Go.” Here is what I said:

1. I’m grateful for the warm cup of coffee I enjoyed as I started writing this post this morning. JWD brewed it and my gratitude stems from feelings of being cared for and feeling safe and relaxed in our home.

2. I am grateful for the dear, special friends we shared breakfast with yesterday. They are the kind of people who offer thoughtful conversation, genuine laughs, and the inspiration to better yourself. We’ve built a bond that feels more like family than friendship.

3. I am grateful for my health. Staying healthy is hard in our sedentary, stressed out, “SAD” (Standard American Diet) culture. I am grateful for workouts and sound sleep and nourishing food and that I have the means to make these things priorities.

4. I am grateful for fuzzy socks and hot tea that keeps me cozy on cold fall nights.

5. I am grateful for this smoothie. It’s the result of a very fun writing assignment that I will share soon.

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Today is a day when 5 is too few.

Thanks for reading!

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Slim By Design

How do slim people stay slim?

Right now I am reading Brian Wansink’s new book, Slim By DesignI’m only about halfway through, but I can already tell it is a recommendation-worthy book. Brian’s theory is that it’s much easier to change our environments to be healthier than it is to change our brains (Amen, brother). Brian observed the habits of slim people in their native environments: their homes, restaurants, grocery store, workplace, and schools and discovered that everything from where you store your cereal to the size of your dinner plates can predict your weight.  Some of Brian’s strategies are already standard protocol in my home (fruit bowl front and center!), some are newly implemented based on his compelling research (check out my fridge below).

All of his advice revolves around one main concept:
Make unhealthy food less convenient and less visible, and make healthy food more convenient and more visible.

A few easy things you can do right now to design a slimmer home:

1) Store all of the snack foods out of sight and put a bowl of fruit on the counter.

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2) Move all of your produce out of the produce bins and on an eye-level shelf in your fridge.

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3) Mummify your treats! Simply opening the freezer and laying eyes on that carton of ice cream can trigger a craving, so wrap the carton in aluminum foil so it doesn’t catch your eye so readily. Every time I open my freezer our wedding cake topper taunts me. Although I would never consider digging in to it for fear of cursing our marriage (but mostly because I’m too lazy to undo they 10 layers of plastic wrap), it does trigger a craving for something sweet. So I mummified it in aluminum foil. Craving conquered.

If you want to know more about Brian’s Slim By Design tips, watch and read here and here.

It doesn’t have to be complicated. Simple steps can make you slimmer!

 

And now for that LARABAR giveaway: Congratulations Stephanie Day! Email me at kayli@truefoodco.com with your mailing address to get your LARABAR goodies!

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Thanks for reading!

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The Power of Putting Relationships In Motion

Yesterday JWD and I went for our first tandem bike ride, about 30 miles roundtrip to a microbrewery. For those who aren’t familiar with tandem riding, here’s a quick lesson (the sum of my knowledge when our adventure began): a tandem bike is built for two or more riders. The person in the front (the captain) pedals and steers and the person in the rear (the stoker) only pedals. I quickly learned something else about tandems: the tandem experience depends greatly on the state of the riders’ relationship.

Maybe some would advise against such heightened activities when your marriage is still in its fragile infancy, but we decided to take the risk ;). As we took off, I began to doubt our decision. As the stoker, I had to relinquish control to JWD, my captain, something I am not very good at. My obstructed view, limited mainly to JWD’s back, left me clueless to the treacherous terrane ahead (pebbles, puddles… you know, the really dangerous stuff). Admittedly, I started out as a pretty annoying backseat driver- giving tips on gear shifting and steering (things I know nothing about- this was, after all, my first time on a tandem), delivering a swift pinch to my captain when I thought he needed to slow down, gasping and swaying my body every time he took a turn…

After several miles of white-knuckling my breakless handlebars, I decided that the only way I was going to enjoy this day was if I let go of my desire to be in control and put my trust in my captain. Most of our twelve riding companions had been on a tandem before- many of them, in fact, were experts. I admired their trust in each other as they rode fluidly, communicated almost telepathically, and told wild stories of their tandem adventures. As I settled in to my stoker role, I felt JWD and I begin to fall into a similarly fluid rhythm. Based on the fact that he hadn’t killed me yet (and the culmination of our entire relationship’s history) I decided that he deserved my trust.

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Maybe it was the pints of pumpkin beer or maybe it was my decision to trust our relationship, but the return trip was was even more enjoyable. We rode along smoothly, feeling very much on the same page. Our strengthened connection with each other left us more able to enjoy the company of our riding companions. We only knew five people in the group at the start, but we walked waddled (saddle sores…) away with seven new friends and a deeper connection to those we already knew.

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Yesterday’s tandem fun left me with two thoughts:

  1. If you want to see what a relationship is made of, put it through an exercise test. Tandem riding (or really any type of group exercise) is a great metaphor for the requirements of a relationship. You must be in sync with your companion in a way that can only arise from trust. Maybe you will hop on the bike with an already established trust or maybe you will have to work to earn each other’s trust. Trust is built on communication, another key requirement of a relationship. If JWD fails to tell me that there’s a big bump coming or he decides to zig or zag without warning, he weakens my trust. Mastering trust and communication with someone delivers a great reward- human connection built to last.
  2. Building activity into your everyday life can be more sustainable and enjoyable than a structured exercise program. I’m not saying we should ditch structured exercise altogether (going to the gym, yoga class, etc.), but there is much to gain from exercising for fun with friends, family, and even strangers. Research shows that when we socialize in a context that requires nonverbal mimicry (pedaling along on bikes, flowing through the same yoga poses), we walk away from that experience with a stronger emotional connection with our companions. In short, moving together creates a bond. Also, as you talk, laugh, and share an endorphine-rich experience, the time and the miles will fly by. You get layers of life’s moments wrapped in one experience: spending time with your significant other, socializing with friends, exercising, decompressing, and self-care. Thirty miles felt like a breeze and we walked away from our riding companions feeling a little closer and a little more connected than when we started.

So if you want to put a relationship to the test, build a new one, or strengthen an existing one, put it in motion. Your relationships will be happier and healthier for it… and you will be too.

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You have until tomorrow to win those 20 free LARABARs! To win: share a link to Running on Sunshine via social media and sign up True Food updates here.

Thanks for reading

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Art, Science & The Meaning of Good Food

I used to hate science.

In high school I was in art club. I had dreams of becoming an artist. A designer, a painter, maybe even a sculptor. I made my own clothes and wore them to school. I entered my drawings and paintings into contests and actually won on a few occasions. I made my own jewelry, I sewed quilts and gave them as gifts, I painted polka dots and palm trees on my bedroom walls. I was a creator.

Fast-forward 6 years. Imagine me sitting in a large lecture hall surrounded by pre-med students desperately trying to decipher what the professor was scribbling on the blackboard: organic chemistry. This was the worst of my science-heavy academia, but many similarly technical courses ensued: anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, medical nutrition therapy… you get the picture.

As I was cooking the other day- carefully examining a recipe in one of my new cookbooks while simultaneously improvising with a dash of this and a substitution for that- I started thinking about the opposing forces of art and science. Some of us naturally sway more in one direction than the other. But these are not “gifts”, they are skills, meaning we can become adept at both no matter which way we tend to lean. And, in my opinion,  we all need a little art and a little science in order to be balanced. As I half-followed that recipe, I realized that this opinion is also a perfect description of my philosophy on food.

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Food is fuel. (True). Food is memories, connection, and creativity (Also true).The sciences get us what we want (lower blood pressure, weight loss, faster race times). The arts are ends in themselves (the warm fuzzies from a bowl of soup on a cold night, the comforting memory of your grandma’s signature pie). Our relationship with food needs the sensibility of science to keep us healthy. It also needs the expression of art to make us feel alive and connected to our culture, to the people we break bread with, and to ourselves. I’ve seen how things can go awry if either of these aspects is forgotten. Ripping the art out of food leaves us with carbs/protein/fat, calorie counting, chugging lemon/cayenne/maple syrup concoctions, and obsessing over ways to “rev our metabolisms”. All art and no science ignores the compelling research that proves food really can be our medicine. Our disordered interpretation of how we should view and experience food has left us with a broken and abusive relationship with the thing that is meant to nourish us on all levels.

I am cooking much more now (for myself and for True Food clients). The creator in me revels in the vibrant colors, endless flavor combinations, and the reassuring act of producing nourishment for myself and others with my own two hands. The scientist beams with pride knowing that each ingredient, recipe, and final meal was carefully crafted with the intention of improving and supporting health.

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Wherever you fall on the science-art spectrum, I encourage you to seek out balance, especially when it comes to food. Without science, we are merely floating into an abyss. Without art, we live a rigid life. As for food, make choices based on what you know will nourish your health (I am confident your intuition will lead you to the right stuff), but don’t forget to create, play, savor, share, and enjoy what’s on your plate.

A soup recipe worth trying:

African Peanut Stew

(adapted from Peas and Thank You)

The Science: a meal of soup will fill you up (fiber- and water-licious!), fuel you up (nice balance of complex carbs, healthy fats, and plant proteins), and make you feel great (loads of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants up in here).
The Art: a blend of the vivacious colors of nature, varying textures, and punchy flavors will have you smiling and “mmm..”-ing until the final spoonful.

Ingredients:

  • 1 can chickpeas, drained and rinsed
  • 1 sweet potato, cubed
  • 1 onion, diced
  • 1 T. curry powder
  • 1 t. cumin
  • 1 T. minced ginger (or 1 t. ginger powder)
  • 2 t. minced garlic
  • dash of cinnamon
  • dash of cayenne
  • 1 14 oz. can fire roasted tomatoes, in juice
  • 1 can light coconut milk
  • 2 c. vegetable stock
  • 2 T. natural peanut butter
  • 1/2 c. red lentils
  • chopped fresh greens (kale or spinach work nicely)

How-To:

  • Combine all ingredients except greens in a soup pot on the stove or in a crockpot and simmer until sweet potatoes are tender. Right before serving, stir in greens until wilted. 

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In the end, we all need a little of both worlds. The scientist must engage creative thinking to solve his hypothesis and the artist must learn technique to master his medium.

Psst… you still have one more week to win 20 LARABARS! All you have to do is share this post and sign up for the True Food newsletter.

Thanks for reading.

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True Bites + A Giveaway!

JWD and I are professional snackers.

At any given moment, we have at least one snack each in our possessions. We have snacks stashed in every bag, glove compartment, suitcase, desk drawer, and even a few jacket pockets. Our elite-level snacking habits recently resulted in what is now referred to as “The Epic Ant Invasion Of 2014″.

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The reason for our snack obsession is simple: neither of us enjoys being hungry. We also don’t enjoy being caught somewhere, snackless and faced only with the dismal offerings of a vending machine. Or worse… a “hangry” and snackless person is too easily persuaded by the alluring smell of cinnamon buns and pretzels at the mall or even by yesterday’s stale donuts in the office kitchen (you know you’ve been there).

Snacking between meals isn’t right for everyone, but it is something to consider if you feel ravenous on a 3-squares-a-day plan (me, me!). When hunger kicks in, sensibility flies out the window. We’d all like to forget that time we dove head-first into that basket of bread or tortilla chips before we even ordered dinner (guilty as charged).

Snacks keep hunger at bay (and sensibility in check) and they can provide an extra boost of nutrition… when done right.

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Snacking has a dark side. Between-meal snacks are singlehandedly blamed for the sharp increase in American calorie consumption since the 1970’s. So where does snacking take a wrong turn? In 2 places: 1) when you eat “snack foods” rather than “whole foods”, and 2) when you simply add snacks in without subtracting from your main meals. So skip the chips, cookies, and candy bars. Snack on whole foods like fruit, veg, nuts, edamame, and hummus. Adjust the portions of your meals and snacks so you feel ready to eat (but not ravenous) when you begin and satisfied (but not stuffed) when you end.

At our house, we dig whole food, easy, and portable snacks.  Here’s our current favorite:

True Bites

Why “True”? Because customizing a snack that is true to you and your taste buds is what it’s all about!

Ingredients:

  •  1 cup old-fashioned oats
  • 1/2 cup nut butter (I used sunflower butter)
  • 1/4 cup cocoa powder
  • 1/4 cup Sunwarrior Protein Powder (optional; simply increase the amount of another dry ingredient if you omit)
  • 1/4 cup ground flaxseed
  • 1/3 cup maple syrup (honey works well too)
  • 1 tsp. cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp. ground ginger
  • Customize: use your favorite nut butter, add shredded coconut, chocolate chips, nuts, dried fruit… whatever makes you happy!

How-To:

  • Combine all ingredients in a large bowl and stir until well-incorporated. If the mixture is too wet or too dry, simply add more of the wet or dry ingredients until you have a not-to-sticky mixture that will hold together.
  • Wet hands, and roll about 1 tbsp. of the mixture into a bite-sized ball. Repeat.
  • Pop in the freezer for 10-15 min. to firm up. Store in a covered container in the fridge.

 

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When batches of bites don’t happen on Sundays, we reach for another favorite: LARABAR. This is one of the only bars I will buy because the ingredients are whole and simple. My favorite flavor, Cashew Cookie, has just TWO ingredients! Simple snacking at its best.

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It’s GIVEAWAY time! As a LARABAR Ambassador, my kind friends at LARABAR sent me samples to share with you!

What you get if you win: 20 LARABARs of 5 different flavors, including a few of my favorites: Cashew Cookie and Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip; and a super cool LARABAR sticker so that everyone knows you too are an elite-level snacker.

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Here’s how you enter to win:

  1. Sign up for our True Food Co. mailing list (first newsletter is out today!).
  2. Share a link to this post on at least one of your social media sites (Twitter, Facebook, etc.)

I will randomly choose the lucky snacker in two weeks, go!

Thanks for reading :)

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Dancing In The Rain

Many of my most significant life events have happened in the rain.

I came to this realization on a particularly stormy bike ride yesterday. I was trekking up a steep hill, wind and rain hammering my face, clothes clinging to my soaked skin. I was consumed by a mix of panic and hastiness that rain provokes. And then I remembered that just over 2 months ago I got married in the rain. And not just rain- black clouds, vicious lightning, and clapping thunder. In a long white dress. Suddenly, feelings of true joy washed over me as I pedaled up that hill. My drenched ride became playful, laughable, and… enjoyable. I felt more alive, more plugged in to the moment.

Why do we allow a little rain to shift our perspective so much? In life, it rains. Not only does it rain, but it storms, hails, tornadoes, tsunamis… Think of all the joyful moments you might be missing because you choose to cry along with the rain instead of dance in it?

It rained the day James proposed to me…

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It rained the day we got married…

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It rained the day I graduated college…

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It rained the last time we moved…

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It rained the day I ran my first marathon…

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It rained the first time I summited a mountain…

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I handle life’s rainstorms pretty well. I credit this to my belief that we are the masters of our own experience. We get to choose how we experience and remember each precious moment. I was surprised by the number of people who complimented me on my calm and happy demeanor the day 100 of our nearest and dearest gathered under a gazebo during a downpour, soaked and soggy, to watch me and JWD honor our love. To me, it was an easy choice to take it in stride. I didn’t see a rainy day, I saw a day on which my heart was overflowing with love and gratitude for JWD, our families, and our friends.

I think rain is good for us. It teaches us that perfection is highly overrated and is, in fact, something to reject rather than strive for. It teaches us that the imperfections are what make life exciting, make us feel truly alive, and connect us with each other. It conditions us to stop sweating the small stuff and to stop waiting for the sunny days to smile. 

A positive outlook is not just good for your soul, it’s good for your health too. One study found that hospital patients with a positive outlook were 58% more likely to live longer than their glass-half-empty counterparts. Aside from longevity, positivity is also linked to better heart health, strong immune systems, and less stress. Those who are positive tend to be exercisers, which is also proven to boost mood, health, and lower stress.

As everyone filed out of the gazebo after our wedding ceremony into the then sun-drenched park, one of our friends said the most incredible thing to me. He said, “There’s no such thing as bad weather, just soft people.” So dig deep and create your own sunshine. It’s not always easy, but it gets easier the more you practice.
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We’ve all been rained on (both literally and figuratively). Do you cry or do you dance?

 A song from our wedding day…

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HjHvJE1XU7E?rel=0&w=420&h=315]

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What’s It Like To Be a True Foodie?

True Food Co. is officially ready to feed you! Wondering what it’s like to be a True Foodie? Here’s what you need to know!

{P.S.- If you haven’t signed up for our email list, there is no time like the present. We’re cooking up some exciting stuff (think giveaways, simple recipes, and motivation). We believe in “less, but better” so we promise not to clutter up your inbox.}

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True Food FAQ

How does it work?

First, our registered dietitian will get to know you- your likes and dislikes, your health concerns, your goals, and your day-to-day desires. Next, we will craft a menu with your uniqueness in mind and determine a cooking and meal schedule that fits with your life. On the agreed upon day, our dietitian-chef will come to your home and prepare all of your meals for the week, leaving behind a fridge stocked with True Food and simple reheating instructions.

 

What’s on the menu?

This is what makes True Food so righteous. Your menu is just that- your menu. At True Food, we don’t believe in cookie-cutter anything (unless, of course, we’re making healthy cookies). Your menu will be developed based on where you are and where you want to go. Are you hoping to improve your high blood pressure? There’s True Food for that. Are you a busy, working mom trying to lose weight and feed your family? There’s True Food for that. Are you an athlete wanting to fuel your sport? There’s True Food for that too.

 

Plant-based… huh?

True Food Co. has a plant-based food philosophy. Plant food is the medicine for whatever ails you- better heart, better body, better athlete, better sleep, better life. Because of this research-based philosophy, most of the food we serve is created using the wonderful world of plants. However, we are not extremists and we don’t discriminate against our omnivorous friends. Do you want your True Food served up with a dash of meat or dairy? Consider it done.

 

What do I get?

True Food’s goal is to give you what you need to take you where you want to go. Whether you need lunches for one, snacks for your wee ones, or dinners to feed your whole hungry crew, we can craft a service that gets the job done. We love crazy, off-the-wall requests. So if you have one, just ask. After all, no one knows what you need better than… well… you!

Bonus: when you join the True Food family, you get your own personal registered dietitian to guide you through the murky waters of nutrition on your path to realizing your health goals.

 

What does it mean to work with a dietitian?

A registered dietitian is qualified to provide you with nutrition therapy targeted at your medical diagnoses and health goals. At the initial meeting, your dietitian will help you build the framework of your nutrition action plan and continue to provide expertise for as long as you choose to be a True Foodie. In the end, the choice is yours. Feel free to utilize our nutrition therapy service as much or as little as you wish.

 

What if I need a True Food vacation?

We think vacations are rad. With one week advanced notice, we are happy to pause your meal package free of charge. So go relax, we’ll be here when you get back.

 

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 Have more questions? Cool, we love your curiosity!

Ready to become a True Foodie? Right on, let’s get cookin’!

Drop us a line at kayli@truefoodco.com

Thanks for reading!

 

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Simple, True Food

For many (maybe all?), food is a battle. What to eat, what not to eat, when to eat, where to eat….. these are the questions of our time and the topics of many prestigious research studies.  I have a new question to add to the list: how? How did we get so out of tune with feeding ourselves? Eating is one of the most basic pieces of being human, yet it’s gotten so complicated. I have seen this first-hand through my work with those who have eating disorders, who are trying to lose weight, who are trying to run faster, who are trying to restore the health of their hearts/kidneys/digestive tract/etc. To take us back to simpler times with a simpler relationship with food is a big job, but it’s one I’m willing to chip away at. Why not start right now? There is no time like the present.

Here are 3 food-related notions to start letting go of today:

1. Food is just fuel. No it’s not. And if you go through life trying to convince yourself of this, you will be flooded with guilt every time you enjoy a slice of your own birthday cake or find yourself warm with comfort as you break bread with friends. Food is fuel, but it’s also enjoyment and connection. This is called “feeding the soul”. It’s a real thing, not just metaphysical nonsense.  IMG_1704

2. Food should be cheap, fast and easy. No it shouldn’t. Think about it: you have ONE body and it relies on food to carry out all of its miraculous functions. This is a hard one to grasp because our food society says quite the opposite. As a nation, we spend less of our income on food than anyone else. Respect yourself, respect the body you reside in, and respect the food you eat. This process is truly one of the most incredible in the world.  IMG_1498

3. “Superfoods” are mandatory. No they aren’t. We don’t need acai berries and cold-pressed green juice from a fancy health food store to be healthy. This is clever marketing, not hard data. Instead, try apples, sweet potatoes, spinach, walnuts, watermelon. Back to the basics.   IMG_1656

One way I’ve decided to contribute to the task of health simplification is by starting a healthy meal delivery company. Instead of just telling you, I want to start showing you. Check it out and get on our mailing list, it’s exciting stuff. True Food Company True Food logo IMG_1391

Thanks for reading :)

 

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2014: A Year in the Kitchen

As JWD and I scribbled down our 2014 goals last week, one goal really stuck out for me: cook more and cook better. Goal writing is not a long-standing tradition for us (2013 was the first), but it proved itself worthy of a repeat. Before we talk cooking, let’s talk goals.

Thinking, writing, and talking about goals can be a powerful catapult to actually achieving them. The more time you spend with your goals, the more REAL and POSSIBLE they become. We like to write ours down, talk about them together, and then post them on the fridge for all to see. This keeps them front and center in our lives, constantly reminding us of what we value. This is key because goals are easy to forget in the daily bustle of life. Out of sight, out of mind. You must make an effort to keep them integrated into everyday life.

Now, back to cooking! Yes, I already cook quite a bit. It’s probably safe to say I cook much more than the average person. However, what many would categorize as “cooking” I do not. When I wrote “cook more” on my goal list, I meant actually cook. Chop things, knead things, sauté things, braise things, follow recipes, and most of all, enjoy and connect with the food while I cook. “Cooking” in 2013 was on auto-pilot… the same things on the menu every week and a lot of non-cooking type of cooking (ex: a bag of frozen veggies + tofu = stir-fry). So what’s the big deal about cooking? Why is it goal-worthy?

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The heart and soul of cooking is about connecting with other humans, sharing, expressing love, nourishing our bodies, unleashing creativity, and taking it upon ourselves to fulfill one of our most basic needs. Cooking is now optional in our society. I am even guilty of fueling this notion. When I sit down with clients for our initial assessment I ask “Do you cook?” as if it is elective.

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However, eating is not optional. At about the same time Americans excused themselves from the kitchen, obesity and chronic disease rates started to rise. We’ve passed off the important responsibility of food preparation to the food industry and they’ve proven themselves untrustworthy for the most part. It’s time to reclaim this duty. And by doing so we will also reclaim our health, our families, and a deeper appreciation of what we are capable of. Magical things happen when you use your five senses and raw ingredients to create something tasty and nourishing for yourself and people you love.

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Cooking every day is not always realistic in our fast-paced jam-packed lives, but doing it whenever you can find the time will be therapeutic. Start small. Here is how I plan to reach my goal:

  1. Read more about cooking (I’m starting with Michael Pollan’s Cooked).
  2. Continue planning weekly meals and include new (and intimidating) recipes.
  3. Cook for others (watch for your invite in the mail (: ).
  4. Encourage others to cook more by sharing my kitchen adventures and teaching people what I learn about conscious cooking (keep your eyes on the blog!).

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Think about your goals. Then write about them, talk about them, and display them for all to see. Map out a plan to make them happen.

And also think about getting your hands dirty in the kitchen once or twice this week.

Thanks for reading :)

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